ST. LUKE'S INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY

WHO Collaborating Centre for Nursing Development in Primary Health Care

DIRECTOR

Erika Ota

STAFF

Kiyomi Asahara

Yasuko Nagamatsu

Kaori Nishigaki

Rika Fukutomi

Yuko Egawa

TERMS OF REFERENCE

Development of People-Centered Care (PCC) based on the values of primary healthcare in the context of aging societies, and contributing to WPRO.

Sharing of information with other member states on the improvement of health literacy based on very good relationships between women with their families on the one hand and professional healthcare providers on the other hand.

Helping to build nursing and midwifery education capacity in low-resource countries in the WPRO region.

This institution is a member of the
WHOCC MIDWIFERY NETWORK

ANNUAL REPORT 2019

As the People-Centered Care Research Department, Research Center, we have developed three activities;

    • Assist WPRO and Member States in the development of community People-Centered Care (PCC) models, based on the values of PHC in the context of aging societies
        • We developed a scale consisting of 37 items concerning 8 factors scored on a five-point scale each to measure partnerships in PCC involving citizens and health care professionals with examination of the reliability and validity. PCC is undertaken through citizen-initiated partnerships with healthcare professionals (hereinafter professionals) to improve health problems experienced by individuals and the local community. We examined the reliability and validity of a scale that we had developed to measure citizen-initiated PCC partnerships between citizens and professionals in health support activities to improve health issues experienced by individuals and local communities.
        • Through the health navigation center, LukeNavi, our activities could improve health literacy among people in the community. LukeNavi provides four community-based health service activities: (1) health navigation, (2) health screening, such as blood pressure, bone density, grip strength and body composition, (3) health-related library, and (4) health-related mini-lectures and mini music concerts. In 2018, Luke-Navi was in operation on more than 223 days. In total, 4607 community visitors participated in our activities, and created adult and older adult learning groups in our urban community. 
        • Health literacy was also enhanced through health-related mini-lectures and the library. The mean participant satisfaction score measured by the 10-point VAS was 9.3. In 2018, there were 12 non-health professional volunteers, nurses, and librarians who contributed to this program. In short, this program strengthened the mental and physical health of the people in the community and contributed to the reduction of soaring health care costs by developing the health literacy of the ageing urban community. Devoted volunteer staff made it possible for this program to be low-cost, and motivated elderly volunteers to participate in community activities. Since aging is one of the most serious and common issues in all developed countries, and is also becoming dramatically prevalent in middle- and low-income countries, our program is expected to provide a new model of enlightening the local community about this issue.
        • The project provides E-learning opportunities to individuals in the community. The core merit of this project lies in the fact that nurses’ and librarians’ expertise and non-health professional volunteers could help strengthen the health literacy of individuals in the community who are flooded by a huge amount of health-related information on the internet and in books. We gave lectures to individuals aged over 18 years in the community at St. Luke’s International University on 24th Nov, 1st Dec 2018, & 23rd Feb and 2nd Mar 2019. On these four days, the six-hour lectures dealt with such issues as how to search useful health-related information on the internet and in books, and how to evaluate the information.
        • The methods used in these lectures consisted of E-learning material designed by our team of researchers and active learning. Thirty individuals (twelve males and eighteen females) with an average age of 54.3 years participated in the program. The program accomplished a maximum possible score of 5.00 on average in the item of Communicative and Critical Health Literacy (e.g. Seeking information from various sources, Extracting relevant information, Considering the credibility of the information, Understanding and communicating the information, Making decisions based on the information), which was revealed by the questionnaire distributed before and after the program. The average participant satisfaction score measured by the 10-point VAS was 9.1. The health literacy e-learning is available on our WHOCC website, and access is free of charge.
        • The people-centered intergenerational day program, “Nagomi-no-Kai” is a weekly intergenerational day program for older adults and school-aged children to enhance cross-generation relations and promote the health of older adults in an urban community.
        • We aim to make a contribution to prevent older adults from becoming home-bound, promote their physical and mental well-being, and maintain and/or improve their quality of life by offering them a meaningful destination and encouraging their energetic participation, while promoting their social capital. We held 18 sessions in the people-centered intergenerational day program during 2018 at a university-related facility on a weekly basis under the leadership of nursing faculty staff (n = 6), a physical health-promoting faculty staff member (n=1), and community volunteers (n=5) living in the central part of Tokyo, which is an ultra-aged urban community.
    • Share Japanese lessons with other Member States on the implementation of health literacy programs, resulting in a better engagement of women and their families with health care providers
        • We implemented three health literacy lessons; (1) a program to encourage young female students to undergo cervical cancer screening; (2) a sibling preparation class; and (3) a program for children and parents about prevention of Asbestos exposure.
    • Help build capacity in nursing and midwifery education in low resource countries of the WPRO region.
        • The faculties from university of nursing, Mandalay, Myanmar, visited to exchange nursing and midwifery education and practice with us, and a faculty and healthcare directors from Lao People’s Democratic Republic also visited on the other period. We shared the health issues among the countries and university education for nursing and midwifery to improve quality nursing education and research.
    • Takahashi K., Sato K., Hishinuma M., Matsumoto N., et al.(2019). Evaluation of E-Learning Materials Designed to Improve Health Literacy in the Local Community: Focusing on the Ability to Access Health Information. Bulletin of St. Luke’s International University, 5, 29-36.
    • Meguro, S. & Kamei, T. (2018). Changes such as depression symptoms of older adult with dementia by continuously participation in an intergenerational day program: a prospective longitudinal mixed methods case study. Japan Society for Intergenerational Studies, 8 (1), 51-59. (In Japanese)
    • Kamei, T. (2018). Intergenerational interaction based on nursing university in urban area. -Case of “Seiroka-Nagomi-no-Kai”, Interchange with Elders, Youth, and Children. Japan Intergenerational Unity Association, 18, 59-63. (In Japanese)
    • Nagayoshi C, Kataoka Y. (2018). Evaluation of a parenting support booklet for multiparas. Journal of Japan Academy of Midwifery, 31(3), 448.
    • Patient safety and People-Centered Care, instructed by Maki Kajiwara from WHO, September in 2018
    • Women’s empowerment, instructed by Prof. Jeanette Takamura from Columbia University